(from "Who's Who in Manchester Connecticut, Centennial Year Edition, 1923"
by Thomas J. Quish)

"HARRY W. KEENEY, one of the present board of selectmen of the town of Manchester, was born on August 7, 1872 in South Manchester, the son of Arthur B. and Rose (Wetherell) Keeney. His family is perhaps the only family in Manchester, or in many other towns in New England, that can trace its lineage directly back to John and Priscilla Alden, well known figures in the history of the Pilgrims, who landed in Plymouth in 1620. Tracing down the family tree of John and Priscilla Alden to the sixth generation, it is found that one Jonathan Watrous, the great - great grandfather on his mother's side of the subject of this story, was a Revolutionary soldier and received a pension for wounds received in battle. Thus it can be seen that Selectman Keeney, stands without doubt as Manchester's most typical example of one who has the blood of the Pilgrims and the Revolutionary forefathers in his veins.
He was educated in what was known as the 15th District School, near the Manchester town line, where Glastonbury and Manchester children were taught under a joint plan between the two towns. He first started to learn his present trade as carpenter working for Captain A. J. Wetherell, who was one of Manchester's best known carpenters and joiners about 30 years ago. Four years were spent under Captain Wetherell's direction and in 1894 Mr. Keeney went to work as a carpenter for Cheney Brothers. He has remained there ever since. At present he is connected with the building and construction end of any experimental work carried on by the Cheney Brothers in their search for new and improved methods of silk manufacturing.

Mr. Keeney's military record is also worthy of note. He enlisted in Company G, First Connecticut Regiment, C. N. G. in 1890. His father, the late Arthur B. Keeney had been captain of the same company and it is only natural that the young man should seek to follow in his footsteps. He served through the ranks and in March 1894 passed his examinations for a second lieutenant's commission to which rank he had been chosen by the company. In February 1896, he was commissioned first lieutenant, and on July 7, 1896, he succeeded the late Captain Charles L. Bissell, who died in office. The present Colonel Harry B. Bissell, of Manchester is a son of the Captain Charles L. Bissell referred to here. As commanding office of Company G, Captain Keeney had finally reached the goal he had set for himself in local military circles, and in January of 1898, he resigned his commission. He was not actively connected with military affairs again until 1917, when the United States declared war against Germany and the state of Connecticut authorities determined to raise a Home Guard to replace the National Guard soldiers, who were to be sent overseas. Mr. Keeney enlisted in Company F, as the local Home Guard unit was called, and on account of his previous military experience was commissioned second lieutenant forthwith. He was promoted to be first lieutenant in, January 1919, and in April of 1920, he succeeded Captain E. Martin Ogden, as commander of Company G, Connecticut State Guard, as the local outfit was then designated. He resigned his captaincy in September of that same year and re-turned to civil life again, although ready to serve if called on.

Harry in January 1934 with Alan and Herbert Bradley

In Manchester fraternal life, Mr. Keeney is affiliated with King David Lodge No. 31, I. O. O. F. and also with Shepherd Encampment. He has long been a member of South Manchester Camp No. 9280, M. W. A. and on account of his military experience, he has been Chief Forester in this organization's degree team for many years. He is also a member of the local Army & Navy Club. In politics, Mr. Keeney has been a staunch Republican and in 1922, he was the Ex-Service Men's candidate for selectman on that ticket. He won easily and was again successful during the past year. On both boards he has served as a member of the highway committee.

Mr. Keeney was married on June 9, 1897, to Miss Dorothy Hall, daughter of the late William Hall, of Manchester. They have two daughters, Mrs. Claudine Ariel, of Springfield, Mass., and Doris Keeney, who lives at home. To his hundreds of friends in Manchester, Mr. Keeney is known as 'Cap". The name is significant of the fact that he has always been a leader, both in civic military and fraternal affairs. He has the happy faculty of being able to make and keep friends. Honest to the core, generous and genial, "Cap" Keeney has a warm spot in the hearts of those who call him friend."

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